Marching Into History

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“Never depend upon institutions or government to solve any problem. All social movements are founded by, guided by, motivated and seen through by the passion of individuals.”
~ Margaret Mead

Yesterday, history was made with women marching & gathering all over the globe to stand in solidarity for human rights, women’s rights, and to stand against derogatory statements made during the election campaign which too many have taken as permission for unacceptable behavior. The energy was palpable at the gathering I attended. I looked around and witnessed generations standing together which reminded me of my own daughter and grandchildren who were held dear in my heart. Also palpable was the common thread to hundreds of other marches both in our country and around the world. I also felt the presence of millions of women who could not be there in person but were cheering on the sidelines from their homes and work places.

I went to stand up for women’s rights that are threatened, to stand up against violence, to stand for equality for all, and to stand for peaceful action over hatred. When I arrived I knew I had made the right decision. What I saw were women, men, and children. Many wore their pink hats that were made as a statement of intention for the march, others carried signs expressing their sentiment, some wore “nasty woman” t-shirts and there was a sense of peaceful intention about the gathering.

Once the group energy coalesced as a sister march for human rights we all felt connected energetically to marches & gatherings everywhere, there was a common sense of purpose — to make a clear statement that we are the people who will not be easily abused, threatened, violated, or disrespected for our gender, our sexuality, the color of our skin, how we worship or from where we’ve immigrated. We walked and gathered in determined peace in order to be heard and seen.

What inspired me was that the marches were began by an idea that one woman had after the election. I am convinced that even one person can, indeed, institute change and mobilization. Looking at photo’s of marches in every large city in the US and cities around the world make me smile with pride. I do believe we made a statement in a very positive way.

Positive psychology focuses on living life with meaning and purpose as well as focusing on what is good and what is working in our lives. A foundational tenant that Chris Peterson spoke of in reference to positive psychology is that “other people matter.” I was marching because I do believe all people matter and deserve a life of meaning and purpose that embraces our diversity and our differences. Whether in DC, Boston, San Francisco, London, Australia, or the smallest of communities, we were there together making our voices heard. I was filled with a sense that I am not alone in my concerns that seem to loom so darkly on the horizon.

I woke this morning noticing that the heaviness I have felt since November had been lifted. I am grateful, more open, and ready to participate in the work that must continue. Complacency is not an option in my mind. Real and lasting change involves action. I am reminded of what Michael Moore encouraged us all to do — make calls every day to our representatives to stand for positive change. A phone call takes minutes yet can be the action we take to carry forward the change we need at this time (202-225-3121) and encourage our representatives to make good and right choices that uphold our Constitution (we the people, for the people) as well as our Bill of Rights.

Finally, I am grateful to my sister after an overdue conversation this afternoon. We generally stand on either side of the political divide. Today we sat down to talk about our views, our concerns, and our hopes. We allowed our love for one another and our willingness to ‘agree to disagree’ to bridge our differences when it comes to politics. We took the time to empathically listen to one another. What we learned is that we want the same things for each other, for those we love, for ourselves, and for our country. Even though we voted differently, I felt the divide narrow into remembering our love for one another.

I want more of these conversations so that the divide in our country can be bridged. I want to listen more to those who disagree with my point of view or my choices. I do believe we want the same when it comes to those we love. Empathy and the willingness to take the time to truly listen is what is needed most as we move forward.

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